Microsoft Whiteboard works on the web

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Microsoft Whiteboard is an app that allows you to mimic what a physical whiteboard does, however being digital it has a number of advantages. One of these advantages is that it works on the web. To see this just visit:

https://whiteboard.microsoft.com/

and sign in with a Microsoft account. You can use your commercial Microsoft 365 account and have all the standard capabilities included.

In our current world of remote work I am finding Microsoft Whiteboard very handy. I really enjoy the ‘infinite’ canvas and the ability to export the output to a file, I typically use Whiteboard on a device like a Surface PC or iPad and share that back to the desktop on which I’m conducting my remote meeting. However, you can also easily share it with others in the company so you can all collaborate together.

The web version isn’t as full featured as the device app as yet but it is more than adequate for most I feel. if you work remotely and want to get your message across, make sure you take a look at Microsoft Whiteboard and now with a web version, nothing could be simpler!

Need to Know podcast–Episode 251

FAQ podcasts are shorter and more focused on a particular topic. In this episode I speak about Windows Information Protection (WIP) is.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2020

Take a listen and let us know what you think – feedback@needtoknow.cloud

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-251-windows-information-protection/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send us any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

Resources

FAQ 15

CIAOPS Patron Community

Windows Information Protection

@directorcia

Example of Microsoft Defender ATP integrations

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I received a incident warning from my Microsoft Defender ATP recently. Turns out that I had downloaded a phishing PDF attachment to see where it was trying to point me. I was careful, and check it closely before downloading. However, Defender ATP also picked up the fact that I had downloaded it jumped into action.

I was curious to see how it had detected it as a threat, as the PDF file itself was harmless, just that the link it contained, and tried to get you to click on, took you to a fake Microsoft 365 login page. Turns out that Defender ATP also uses third party indicators like Virus Total as highlighted above.

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When I clicked on the link Defender ATP provided it took me the Virus Total site as shown above. Here you can see that the file was detected as phishing by four common engines.

The more you look at Defender ATP the more extensive it is. If you haven’t taken a look at everything it can do I strongly encourage you to do so.

Need to Know podcast–Episode 250

I’m joined in this episode by MVP Lisa Crosbie to talk about what’s new in the Power Platform, especially Project Oakdale or as it was known when we recorded it, Microsoft Dataflex. Lisa shares with us what this technology is all about, how it integrates and the benefits it can provide businesses.

There is also cloud news and updates from Microsoft at the top of the show, as usual to keep you up to date.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2020

Take a listen and let us know what you think – feedback@needtoknow.cloud

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-250-lisa-crosbie/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send us any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

Resources

@lisamcrosbie

@diirectorcia

Lisa Crosbie on YouTube

Lisa Crosbie on Linkedin

The UP podcast

Power App in a day

Dataflex in now Project Oakdale

Available for preorder today, Surface Duo is purpose-built for mobile productivity

Microsoft Surface Duo Press Briefing

Microsoft Office 365—Do you have a false sense of cloud security?

Introducing EDR in block mode

End users can now report “This wasn’t me” for unusual sign-in activity

What’s new: Azure Sentinel and Microsoft Defender ATP improved alert integration

CIAOPS Getting Started with Azure Sentinel online course

Microsoft Whiteboard in Teams Adds Sticky Notes and Text, Improves Performance

Maximize cost control with new auto-shutdown setting

Allow administrators to delete any chat message in Teams

By default, in Microsoft Teams, you have the ability to delete your own messages but not other people’s. That’s a good thing unless you are an administrator or owner of the Team. There are plenty of cases where a chat message from another member of the Team could be considered inappropriate and needs to be removed by an administrator. Problem is that, generally, even an administrator cannot delete another person’s chat message.

This behaviour can be changed in the Teams administration portal by making changes to the appropriate Messaging policy.

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You’ll firstly need to navigate to the Teams administration center which you can access via the Microsoft 365 admin center. You can also get there directly by navigating to:

https://admin.teams.microsoft.com/

You then need to select Messaging policies from the items on the left as shown above.

Then, on the right, you will see the option to Manage policies, which you should select.

Most tenants should only have a single policy as shown above, but if not you’ll need to select the appropriate policy you wish to change. Simply click on the policy name you wish to change. Here, I’ve selected the only one available Global (Org-wide default).

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Ensure the option Owners can delete sent messages is set on On as shown above.

You’ll now need to wait for that policy to be updated to your Team. It will take a little while so don’t expect the changes to be seen immediately. Not that I have tried to see whether using PowerShell to force the changes works any quick but if you find it does, let me know. The command you want if you plan to user PowerShell to make this change is:

set-csteamsmessagingpolicy –tenant <GUID> –allowownerdeletemesage $true

Once the changes in the policy have been pushed out to the Team, any owner of that Team will now be able to delete any chat message from any user as simply as they can their own messages.

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This ability will hopefully make life a little easier for Team owners who need to ensure compliance and appropriate behaviour in their Teams.



Need to Know podcast–Episode 249

FAQ podcasts are shorter and more focused on a particular topic. In this episode I speak about what Office 365 Alerts is and provide some best practice suggestions.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2020

Take a listen and let us know what you think – feedback@needtoknow.cloud

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-249-azure-information-protection/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send us any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

Resources

FAQ 14

CIAOPS Patron Community

Azure Information Protection

@directorcia

New templated email policies

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If you dip into your Microsoft 365 Security and Compliance Center, then into Threat Management and then into Policy as shown above you might some new Templated policies.

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This will allow to select from two ‘best practices’ policies for your email protection from Microsoft. There is a standard and a Strict protection option.

You’ll find details about these here:

Preset security policies in EOP and Office 365 ATP

and if you want to know the low level settings that use you can find that here:

Recommended settings for EOP and Office 365 ATP

At the moment they are not enabled by default, but I can see the day when at the least the Standard template will be applied to all new tenants.

Of course, these are just a starting point for securing your email environment in but I certainly recommend that you do start with these templates because they apply a lot of best practices quickly and easily. They also configure not just Exchange Online but also Office 365 Advanced Threat protection (ATP) if that is part of the tenant.