Need to Know podcast–Episode 285

I’m back baby! It’s been quite a while now but I’ve decided to start getting the Microsoft Cloud information and updates out there irrespectively of whether there is a guest or not. Let’s see how that goes and please let me know what you think and any suggestions you may have.

I’ll also bring you up to date with all the latest news from the Microsoft Cloud.

Take a listen and let us know what you think – director@ciaops.com

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-285-updates/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send me any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2022.

Brought to you by www.ciaopspatron.com

Resources

@directorcia

Basic Authentication Deprecation in Exchange Online – September 2022 Update

Stream mobile app in beta

Microsoft to drop Kaizala in 2023

Microsoft Security highlights from Black Hat USA 2022

What’s new in Microsoft Endpoint Manager – 2208 (August) edition

Microsoft Defender monthly news August

Enabling corporate access using browser controls in Windows

Microsoft Entra Verified ID now generally available

Microsoft announces new solutions for threat intelligence and attack surface management

Microsoft Ignite

CIAOPS Shared channel

CIAOPS Need to Know webinar September

Set up PAYG for Power Platform

The Power Platform now has the ability to be Pay As You Go (PAYG) for licensing. This is a great option to get access to many advanced capabilities on demand. When you configure this option the billing is done via Azure rather than Microsoft 365. This means, prior to setting up PAYG for the power Platform, you’ll need to have an Azure subscription in place. As I have highlighted before:

Deploy Office 365 and Azure together

Once you have the Azure subscription in place, inside the same tenant where you want to enable PAYG for the Power Platform, you’ll need to have or create an Azure Resource group that will be associated with the PAYG option. You need to create this ahead of time. The following will show you how to create one if you need to:

Manage Azure resource groups by using the Azure portal

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You’ll then need to visit the Power Platform admin center which is at:

https://admin.powerplatform.microsoft.com/

then select Billing policies. From the top menu now select New billing policy as shown above.

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Give the policy a name, the name needs to be at least 10 alphanumeric characters. Select Next to continue.

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Now select the Azure subscription you want the billing ties to. Then select the Resource Group that you want to use, the must already be in your Azure subscription as aI noted earlier. Finally select the region and press Next to continue.

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Now add any environment to the subscription and press Next to continue.

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Here select Create Billing Policy.

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The policy should now be created and displayed as shown above.

You create additional billing policies if you wish by simply repeating the above process. Doing so would allow you to tie that policy to a different Azure subscription and/or Resource Group for billing and management if needed.

For more details on the Power Platform PAYG option see:

Set up pay-as-you-go

New Intune connection PowerShell script

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I’ve uploaded a new connection to Intune script that is freely available on my Github repository. You’ll find it here:

https://github.com/directorcia/Office365/blob/master/Intune-connect.ps1

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Once it has been run you can run commands like:

get-autopilotprofile

as shown above.

To allow this script to operate correctly you’ll need the following two modules installed:

WindowsAutoPilotIntune

and

Microsoft.Graph.Intune

Both of these will be installed as part of my o365-setup.ps1 and o365-update.ps1 scripts, which are also freely available.

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I’ve also added this Intune connection script to the connection selector script (c.ps1) in the same repository.

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When intune-connect.ps1 runs you’ll be prompted for your credentials as normal.

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Then you password and MFA if required.

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Because connection to Intune via PowerShell now uses the Microsoft Graph, you’ll need to allow the above permissions as shown once.

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You’ll find those permissions, when you accepted them, in Azure AD, User, Applications as shown above inside the Azure portal. In there will be an application called Microsoft Intune PowerShell as shown above.

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If you select that Microsoft Intune PowerShell and scroll down to the bottom of the screen that is displayed, you can select a link View granted permissions as shown above.

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You will then see all the permission granted to that user for accessing the Graph. You can also remove these if you ever want to as well here.

Having access to Intune and Autopilot via PowerShell will make automating device management much easier.

Need to Know podcast–Episode 256

We’ve crossed the 8 bit barrier and now into 16 bit episode numbers! I’ll give you a quick round up of what I thought was the most important announcements from Microsoft and where you can go to get all the information Microsoft recently provides about its products. Then I’ll speak with Microsoft MVP Lars Klint about his project with llamas. Yup, that’s the animal, not some secret code word. So listen in for some fun as well as interesting take away Lars has to share in this episode.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2020

Take a listen and let us know what you think – feedback@needtoknow.cloud

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-256-lars-klint-and-llamas/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send us any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

Resources

@larsklint

@directorcia

Introducing llama cam

llama cam

Lars Klint blog

Ignite book of news

Ignite on demand sessions

New management capabilities for Microsoft Defender Antivirus in Microsoft 365 Business Premium

Announcing Microsoft 365 Lighthouse for Managed Service Providers serving small & medium customers

Seven ways we’re empowering every person and every organization to thrive in a new world of work

Discover the new Teams feature that supports social-emotional learning

Microsoft Defender for Endpoint adds depth and breadth to threat defense across platforms

Announcing SharePoint Syntex

Celebrating the top OneDrive moments from Microsoft Ignite 2020

SharePoint admin and migration announcements at Ignite 2020

What’s New in Microsoft Teams

Collaboration, communication and knowledge sharing with Microsoft Teams, SharePoint, Project Cortex

Need to Know podcast–Episode 249

FAQ podcasts are shorter and more focused on a particular topic. In this episode I speak about what Office 365 Alerts is and provide some best practice suggestions.

This episode was recorded using Microsoft Teams and produced with Camtasia 2020

Take a listen and let us know what you think – feedback@needtoknow.cloud

You can listen directly to this episode at:

https://ciaops.podbean.com/e/episode-249-azure-information-protection/

Subscribe via iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/ciaops-need-to-know-podcasts/id406891445?mt=2

The podcast is also available on Stitcher at:

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/ciaops/need-to-know-podcast?refid=stpr

Don’t forget to give the show a rating as well as send us any feedback or suggestions you may have for the show.

Resources

FAQ 14

CIAOPS Patron Community

Azure Information Protection

@directorcia

Need to Know bot for your Microsoft Cloud Q and A

Recently I wrote an article about using Microsoft At to create,

a dedicated Microsoft Cloud Search engine

Another form of AI that is available is a chatbot service for questions and answers. Many people have seen these already on web sites, where a helpful customer service rep appears on your web page asking if you need assistance. I have now created a similar chat experience which I have christened the CIAOPS N2Kbot.

You’ll find the N2KBot here:

http://bit.ly/n2kbot

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When you first arrive you’ll see a page like that shown above. simply enter your question in the lower line (where it says type your message” and then press enter). I haven’t as yet automated it greet you as personally I find that annoying. So for now, you can interact manually.

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You’ll see above that if I ask “what is aip” I get a response back about Azure Information Protection.

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At the bottom of the page, you’ll also find a link to add the N2KBot to your Team if you want, as shown above.

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You can have it as a private bot or inside a channel if you wish. Once installed you activate the bot by starting a line with @n2kbot and then asking as question, like:

@n2kbot what is aip

as shown in the above example.

What is interesting about this chatbot versus the custom search engine I created previously, is how people so far have interacted with it. Most have treated this chatbot like a search engine, expecting to give them the exact answer to the question they asked. A chatbot really isn’t that. It is basically a list of question and answer pairs. That is, if you type in this (or close to it), then answer with this. It doesn’t search the web, it looks to it’s pre-programmed question and answers pair largely.

You can prime the chatbot with your own custom questions and answers or you can target web links. Sites that have lots of FAQs (frequently asked questions) on it ingest very well into the bot. However, it is important to remember that chatbots are not search engines.

So where could I see chatbot playing a role? I think they would work well for adoption, that is people asking basic questions about OneDrive for example (i.e. “How do I upload to OneDrive”) or things like “What is Sway”. So think of chatbots more as a way to answer common questions in an automated way. When you actually sit down and have a look at how many times the same or similar questions get asked you begin to appreciate the role that chatbots could play.

I am still testing this chatbot concept out in the area of providing information specifically on the Microsoft Cloud but, as I said, I can see an initial benefit in things like adoption, which I have started working on. In an upcoming article, I’ll show you how easy it is to create a chatbot like this in Azure. However, the idea for this preliminary article is to get you thinking about:

1. The differences between chatbots and search

2. Where a chatbot may make sense in your business. That is, what information is going to help with?

Once you have that, then creating an effective chatbot will be much easier in my experience.

In the meantime, feel free to have a play with the N2KBot and let me know your thoughts. It is far from perfect and only runs on the cheapest plan, so it might be a bit slow initially when you use it. However, once ‘awake’ it should perform normally. If you have some suggestions for the questions it should be able to answer, let me know, I’m very interested to hear other people’s thoughts on this.

My aim with all this, is to get the cogs in my head turning about where this new “AI” technology can effectively be applied. They are certainly beginning to turn in mine.

Secure logging with Microsoft 365 presentation

Here’s the slides from my longer presentation today at Ignite Copenhagen

Securely logging to Microsoft 365

Getting access to your information in Microsoft 365 starts with logging in but is it secure as it could be? Understanding security options at the point of entry like MFA, Legacy Authentication and Conditional Access on all devices is critical to keeping information protected as it is not only you that is trying to log into your account these days! Learn what security technologies you can add at login and the best practices approaches to configuring and monitoring these. Security starts  at the doorway to Microsoft 365 and simple configurations can greatly reduce your risks of unauthorised access. Come and learn what can be done.

https://www.slideshare.net/directorcia/securely-logging-to-microsoft-365