Gratitude

The 25th of April here in Australia and New Zealand marks the anniversary of our first major conflict, fighting under the national flag. The operation at Gallipoli was designed as a diversion to relieve the hard pressed allied forces fighting in France since 1914. This gave birth the legend of ANZAC that we celebrate today.

That anniversary is now more than a hundred years in our past but we continue to use it as the rally point for contributions made by all members of our armed forces over the years. To be willing to serve and die for your country and people within is a special trait indeed. The hope is that we will never see carnage on the scale we have seen in the World Wars, but yet sadly, conflict continues throughout the world.

As much as today is a time to reflect on the sacrifices of the past it should also be a time to express gratitude for what we have today. The people around us, our families, friends, work colleagues and more all add to the fabric of our lives in very positive ways. It is easy in today’s age to over look the simple things, to say thanks to those we love and to help others without the expectation of return. Those that went to places like Gallipoli did this. Those that fight today to keep us safe do this. Those that respond to every day emergencies do this. And for all that we should be grateful.

We can honour the past, we can live in the present but we must plan for the future. We need to take this opportunity to think about how we can make this world a better place. How we can live up to the standards we see from others? Yes, we will fail. Yes, it will be a challenge, but if we truly take the spirt of ANZAC to heart we will continue to sacrifice every day in whatever small way as a daily expression of gratitude.

Start today. Ask yourself, how can I be more grateful because things could surely be a whole lot worse than they are right now!   

For those interested in learning of the continued sacrifices that the ANZACs made after withdrawing from Gallipoli in World War 1, when they went to fight in northern France until the end of the war, should visit my web site:

ANZACs in France

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